Dentist - Oak Park
1002 North Blvd.
Oak Park, IL 60301
 

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Brush With Confidence

A child’s genes do not assist decay causing bacteria, and, it is very much possible that a child and parent can control the growth of access bacteria found in the oral cavity. The mouth harbors many species of microbes. Most of the species are favorable. Some, though, secrete acidic waste products when fed sugar. This acidic environment weakens the teeth, making it easier for decay to form. Being taught to brush your teeth regularly is imperative to maintain optimum oral health. Even more supporting, being taught aggressive home care hygiene techniques as well as proper nutritional habits, reflects and helps to shape a person’s oral ecosystem. There’s a suspicion amongst some people and even dental and health professionals that certain children are doomed to develop dental cavities. The overall hypothesis states that there are a combination of genes that support sorts of oral bacteria that causes cavities. There is a study published in “Cell Host and Microbe” by Andres Gomez and Karen Nelson of the J Craig Venter Institute, in San Diego that suggest that theory is not true.

As follows, the “volunteers” were selected by their parents and a total of 280 fraternal twins and 205 pairs of identical twins all aged between ages five and 11 who had not taken antibiotics during the previous six months to participate. The children were asked to refrain from brushing their teeth the evening and the morning before data collection. The researchers then swabbed the mouths of these children (the clefts between teeth and gums). The teeth were scored amongst three categories: having no signs of current or previous dental cavities; having signs of current or previous cavities affecting the enamel; or having signs of cavities that penetrates the enamel and affected the underlying enamel. Dr. Gomez and Dr. Nelson found no bacteria that was responsible for cavities in the mouths of these twins. These results make it clear that the supporting idea that no matter how well some kids brush their teeth, they’re fated to suffer from cavities are not the truth. Along with brushing, flossing, mouth rinsing, and perhaps avoiding sugary foods or intaking access amounts of carbohydrates, shapes an unhealthy oral ecosystem